I dreamt vividly about Chaucer and his Canterbury Tales only stirred from my medieval slumber by a rattling noise.  Possibly an ancient timbrel drum as I slowly pass by the imposing walls of Canterbury Castle with my fellow pilgrims.  But no, the rattling is coming from my chest.  The damned virus has slithered down from my larynx and infested my lungs. I open my mouth to speak and we quickly establish that one honk means yes and two means no.

I could have cried.  This morning’s event was the reason I am here.  A conducted tour of the University of Kent, but after an unparalleled Canterbury Lodge full English breakfast, paracetamol and a huge dose of mind over matter, I managed to walk 7 miles.

Hopping on a bus – the Canterbury bus service is excellent – we arrived at the leafy campus on a beautiful sunny, but chilly day.  I love being on campuses.  Always such a hive of activity yet no hint of stress, nobody is rushing anywhere, apart from the odd first year who is late for the next lecture.  The campus at Kent Uni covers 300 acres, so having a guide is essential.  And, with a stunning view like this every time you step out of the impressive Templeman Library, it’s not surprising everybody is so laid back.
IMG_8355 3 The University of Kent’s campus with a view from where you can see the spires of the mighty cathedral

Our students are encouraged to become global citizens, to think independently and develop original ideas. It’s what makes Kent such a fascinating place to study and work.

Gavin Esler – Chancellor

GraduationThe University was founded in 1965 and I was blown away by their facilities, not just the cutting edge teaching blocks and the student accommodation on campus, but the added extras … the shops, coffee bars, the cinema and so much more.  This is very much a multicultural student hub, our guide was an effervescent Italian girl in her third year so, with Brexit looming, I very much hope it stays that way.  I cannot imagine anywhere better to devote three years of your life studying and the enthusiasm shown by both students and staff made it an uplifting experience. The presentation ceremony must be something to behold because it takes place in the mighty cathedral.

Completely wasted by 2.00p.m. I went back the Canterbury Lodge for a little R and R, before an early meal at the Bishops Finger in St. Dunstans Street.  Best known for selling their chicken wings by the kilo, I went for a medicinal Monk’s Burger, which was excellent.

So I didn’t spend as much time as I would have liked exploring Canterbury because of the state of my health, which included the Cathedral Tour.  But I do have an excuse to return … often from September 2018 … and I will visit the wonderful cathedral then, take a boat trip up the river, go to The Marlowe Theatre and much, much more.  For I have lost my heart to Canterbury.

Here bygynneth the Book of the tales of Caunterbury. Geoffrey Chaucer

Written by Tessa Barrie

Writer and blogger from Jersey in the Channel Islands UK who believes life is too short to be niche. 🙃 Currently working on her first novel.

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